Geoff Mangum's PuttingZone Research

Sample Section: 1.05.21.

2001 Geoff Mangum. All rights reserved.

1.05.21., .-- , -- GOLF -- PSYCHOLOGY / GOLF PSYCHOLOGY, , ,

1.05.21., Appino, J.P & Gordin, R.D., The effects of the Self Control Triad Mental Training Program on golf putting consistency, In Serpa, S., et al. eds., Proceedings: VIII World Congress of Sport Psychology, (Lisbon: Int'l Soc. of Sport Psychology, 1993), 629-633, VIIIth World Cong. of Sport Psychology, Lisbon, Portugal, 1993

1.05.21., Aultman, Dick, Golf primer: How to think when putting, Golf Dig., 29(1), Jan 1978, 111, long putts: think speed / distance; short putts: line / direction; make putter move down line after impact.

1.05.21., Bailey, Charles William, The Brain and Golf: Some Hints for Golfers from Modern Medical Science, (London: Mills & Boon, 1923), , 96p; 2d ed., 1924; Boston: Small Maynard, 1924.

1.05.21., Bailey, Charles William, M.A., The Brain and Golf: Some Hints for Golfers from Modern Mental Science, (London: Mills & Boon, 1923), , 96p; subconscious control of swing

1.05.21., Bailey, Charles William, M.A., The Professor on the Golf Links: Some Sidelights on Golf from Modern Science, (London: Silar Birch, 1925), ,

1.05.21., Barden, R.C. & Ford, M.E., Optimal Performance in Golf, (Minneapolis, MN: Optimal Performance Systems, 1990), ,

1.05.21., Beauchamp, P.H., Psychological Influences on Golfer's Putting Performance, (Ann Arbor, MI: Univ. Microfilms Int'l, 1996), ,

1.05.21., Blackwood's Edinburgh Mag., Golf psychology, Blackwood's Edinburgh Mag., 143, 683, NEED YEAR

1.05.21., Cockerill, I.M., Personality and golfing ability, Res. Papers in Phys. Ed., 6, Jul 1968, 18-22, Leeds, England; Cattell Sixteen Personality Factor Questionnaire administered to 30 low handicap (0-4) and 30 medium handicap (13-16) golfers; better players found to be more aggressive, competitive, self-assured, and unconventional than those of lower ability

1.05.21., Cohn, Patrick J., An exploratory study on peak performance in golf, Sport Psychologist, 5(1), Mar 1991, 1-14,

1.05.21., Cohn, Patrick J., Great Putting Right Now! Mental Keys to Confident Putting, (1998), , audiocassette read by Robert K. inters, $8.40 b&n

1.05.21., Cohn, Patrick J. & Winters, Robert K., The Mental Art of Putting: Using Your Mind to Putt Your Best--The Psychology of Great Putting, (South Bend, IN: Diamond Communications, Inc., 1995), ,

1.05.21., Coop, Richard & Fields, Bill, Mind Over Golf: How to Use Your Head to Lower Your Score, (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1993), ,

1.05.21., Coop, Richard & Fields, Bill, The Mental Side of Golf, (New York: Macmillan, 1993), ,

1.05.21., Davidson, J.D. & Templin, T.J., Determinants of success among professional golfers, Res. Q. for Exercise & Sport, 57, 1986, 60-67, 1983 PGA Tour player statistics

1.05.21., De Jonge, P., When the putting goes bad, New York Times Mag., 13 Mar 1988, 32+,

1.05.21., Dennis, Larry, The pros explore the outer limits, Golf Dig., 35(10), Oct 1984, 34-39, D.A. Weibring: Golf is 100 percent mental.; Geiberger and Sheehan use Syber Vision Neuro-Muscular Programming tapes, for relaxation and tempo.

1.05.21., Dorney, Lisa; Goh, Emil K.M. &Lee, Christina, The impact of music and imagery on physical performance and arousal: Studies of coordination and endurance, J. of Sport Behavior, 15(1), Mar 1992, 21-33,

1.05.21., Dorsel, Thomas, The putter: The mental side of putting, Golf Mag., 33(5), May 1991, 54,

1.05.21., Dorsel, Thomas & Salinsky, D.M., Enhancing willingness to practice golf through use of a mastery approach, Perceptual & Motor Skills, 70(2), Apr 1990, 415-418, 3 practice techniques compared for putting effectiveness: perceived usefulness and willingness to practice were enhanced with mastery practice approach, even though actual putting results were the same for all 3 methods

1.05.21., Dunlop, S., Golfing bodymind: Part 1, Golf Illus., 194(3629), 17 May 1979, 18-19,

1.05.21., Dunn, Seymour, Golf psychology, Golf Dig., 28(12), Dec 1977, 105-106, 108, From SD, Golf Fundamentals (1922; repr. NY: Arno Press, 1977); physics, mechanics, anatomy, psych.; mechanics as basis of touch; 105-106: The actions involved in doing the thing are to be correct automatic performance, the result of distinct paths in the nervous system, ploughed out by repeated practice of the right kind. 106: The body muscles receive their instructions and initiative from the mind. The mind gets its inspiration through the eye. Therefore in aiming look attentively not only at the ball but also at the objective point -- the hole or fairway target you have chosen -- so that the eye will register clearly on the mind the thing to be accomplished. [cant assess distance accurately, with real precision, without this sort of focused look -- not the same as an eye-tension filled stare at hole, a look with concentration but with relaxed eye muscles.]

1.05.21., Epstein-Shepherd, Bee, Mental Management for Great Golf: How to Control Your Thoughts and Play Out of Your Mind, (Los Angeles: Lowell House, 1996), , how to avoid subconsciously hypnotizing yourself to play below potential and how to hypnotize yourself to play at your maximum potential

1.05.21., Fasciana, Guy S., Golf's Mental Magic, (Holbrook, MA: Bob Adams, Inc., 1994), ,

1.05.21., Flanagan, M., Golf Psychology: A New Approach to Golf and Instruction, (New York: M. Flanagan Publications, 1988), , 296p

1.05.21., Forster, R., How hypnosis can help your game, Golf Monthly, 71(12), Dec 1981, 68-69,

1.05.21., Foster, David, Thinking Golf, (London: Pelham Books, 1979), , 187p; called by one leading golf writer: the most important work of research ... since David Williams produced The science of the golf swing.

1.05.21., Gallwey, W. Timothy, Inner Game of Golf, (New York: Random House, 1981), ,

1.05.21., Gallwey, W. Timothy, Inner game of Miller, Golf Mag., 24(6), Jun 1982, 47-48, 55,

1.05.21., Golf Magazine, Low handicapper: Think connection when you putt, Golf Mag., 37(5), May 1995, 150,

1.05.21., Hackbarth, John C., The Key to Better Golf: A Mental Plan, (Madison, Wis.: Democrat Pub. Co., 1929), , 183p

1.05.21., Haultain, Arnold, The Mystery of Golf, (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1908; new ed., NY: Serendipity Press, 1965, with foreword by Herbert Warren Wind; repr Sandwich, MA: Chapman Billies, Inc., 1997), , 78: The Old Adam dies hard. 84: The net-work of chains in the golfer's brain must be multitudinous. 88: Talk as neurologists and psychologists may, what this fearfully and wonderfully made thing called mind is we have not the remotest conception. 91: What particular giant-cell in the cortex of the brain fails to act when we take our eye off the ball? Will any electrode teach us that? ... Constantly one part of the mind takes another to task for dereliction of duty. 93: What exasperates the ordinary man about golf is that it seems to be a game utterly and absolutely unamenable to reason. 100: To foozle at golf -- how it hurts!

1.05.21., Haultain, Arnold, The Mystery of Golf, (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1908; new ed., NY: Serendipity Press, 1965, with foreword by Herbert Warren Wind; repr Sandwich, MA: Chapman Billies, Inc., 1997), , 151p; new ed., NY: Serendipity Press, 1965, with foreword by Herbert Warren Wind; repr 1997, Sandwich, MA: Chapman Billies, Inc.; ch XVI, pp. 66-68, The Action of the Nerves; ch XVII, pp. 68-79, Anatomical Analysis.

1.05.21., Hogan, Chuck; Van Dalsem, D. & Davis, S., Five Days to Golfing Excellence, (Lake Oswego, OR: M. Miller, 1986), , 162p

1.05.21., Hyslop, Theodore B., Mental Handicaps in Golf, (London: Bailliere Tindall, 1927; Baltimore: Williams & Wilkins Co., 1927), , 111p

1.05.21., Irwin, Hale, Think your way to better scoring, Golf World, 16(9), Sep 1977, 52-53,

1.05.21., Kemp, Charles F., Smart Golf: A Study of the Mental and Emotional Side of Golf, (Fort Worth, TX: Branch-Smith, 1974), , 146p

1.05.21., Keogh, B.K. & Smith, C.E., Personal Par: A Psychological System of Golf for Women, (Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics Publishers, 1985), , 91p

1.05.21., Kraft, R.E., What research tells the golf coach about putting, Scholastic Coach, 55(6), Jan 1986, 110-113, 117, New York, NY

1.05.21., Kraft, R.E., What research tells the golf instructor about the golf swing and putting, ERIC: ED 316 513, ,

1.05.21., Lampert, Lawrence D., The Pro's Edge: Vision Training for Golf, (Boca Raton, FL: Saturn Press, 1998), , 89: Most people have experienced the zone, but they don't know how to putt themselves into the zone. They mistakenly believe it is luck or it just happens. When you are in the zone, it's like you're on automatic pilot with everything just going right. But you can put yourself into that zone with practice. In school we all learn about the five senses. Sight, hearing, taste, smell, and touch. In sports vision training we also consider balance, internal feelings such as energy level and hunger, and the little voice in our head (self-talk) or thinking. [90] When you're walking around in the environment you will flip from one sense to another as these sense are usually controlled by external factors. You may be watching a bird fly (visual), when someone distracts you by speaking to you (hearing). You could be set over the ball in golf and your buddies are joking around and this distracts you. You keep going in and out of different systems. You look at something, you hear something, you feel something, you smell something, etc. When this happens, the system you are using keeps changing and you are not controlling it. The key to the zone is to control which sense is dominant. For most sports you want to stay in the visual system. To stay in the visual system, let your eyes control your muscles -- not your thoughts or feelings. If we go back to our golfer in the zone, she sees it better. The golfer in the zone is better focused (even that is a visual word). He or she is not thinking when in the zone.

1.05.21., Lampert, Lawrence D., The Pro's Edge: Vision Training for Golf, (Boca Raton, FL: Saturn Press, 1998), , 90: To be in the zone you must control which sense you are using. For most sports you must stay in the visual. You react to visual stimulus without thinking. Like avoiding a car accident, you react reflexively and quickly to what you see without thinking. ... You will use other systems for information in golf. For example, if you can't tell which way the wind is blowing you can tune into your auditory system by closing your eyes and turning your head until you hear the wind in both ears. When you hear the wind in both ears, your nose is pointing at the wind. This is an old sailor's trick my friend Dan taught me. Just remember to tune into the system you need for the task and you be in control of the selection -- don't let the environment choose for you or you will be confused. So when we think back to being in the zone in sports, you are most likely in the visual system. You just see it and react like a reptile. The eyes direct the motor system (muscles). There is no thinking in the zone. There is no self-talk in the zone. There is no cognition in the zone. When in the visual zone the mind is a blank. I've had players tell me their putting improved when they stopped analyzing verbally in their heads and just walked up to the ball, looked at it, and stroked it. All the self-talk robbed them of being in the zone. If you cannot stop thinking, move your eyes from object to object without analyzing until the voice in your head stops.

1.05.21., Langfeld, H.S., Mind in golf, Century, 87, Dec 1913, 279-281,

1.05.21., Larsson, Gary; Cook, C. & Starrin, B., A time and cost efficient stress inoculation training program for athletes: A study of junior golfers, Scand. J. of Sports Sciences, 10, 1988, 23-28,

1.05.21., Laurence, M. & Hogan, Chick, Make Every Shot a Nice Shot: Development Golf for the 21st Century, (Sports Enhancement Associates, Monitor Productions, 1988, 2 audio cassettes, 1 videocassette), , imagine shots and avoid negative thinking

1.05.21., Low, George & Barkow, Al, The Master of Putting: Classic Secrets of a Putting Legend, (New York: Lyons & Burford, 1983), , 8: Very often, if you come up with some mechanics in which you can believe, and seem to work more often than not, the psychological side of the issue just fades away.

1.05.21., Moore, Charles W., The Mental Side of Golf, (New York: Horace Liveright, 1929), , 167p; foreword by Gene Sarazen

1.05.21., Moriano, R., Mental, golf et putting, Med. du Sport, 68(4), sep/oct 1994, 181-182, Paris; two mental attitudes contrasted: hypercontrol with tension and loss of feel, and a decontraction with a bad concentration. Precise, repeated ritual of body position, study of ideal line, and same speed for all movements decrease psychological tension and allow the positive visual imagination

1.05.21., Morley, David C., Missing Links: Golf and the Mind, (New York: Atheneum, 1976), , 235p

1.05.21., Nashida, T. & Kato, E., Psychological skills test for golfers (PSTG), In Cochran, A.J. & Farrally, F.R., eds., Science and Golf II: Proceedings of the 1994 World Scientific Congress of Golf, St. Andrews, Scotland, (London: E. & F.N. Spon, 1994),

1.05.21., Nashida, T. & Kato, E., Psychological skills test for golfers (PSTG), In Ostrow, Andrew C., ed., Directory of Psychological Tests in the Sport and Exercise Sciences, (Morgantown, WV: Fitness Info. Technology Inc., 2d ed., 1996), item 310, 495-496,

1.05.21., Nicklaus, Jack, Jack's lesson tee: No. 8: Putting: Mental approach and strategy, Golf Dig., 23(7), Jul 1972, 46-49,

1.05.21., Nieporte, Tom & Sauers, D., Mind Over Golf, (Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1968), ,

1.05.21., Nuhn, Gary, The Tour: Mind games: Some Tour pros have decided that improved play depends largely on the mental side of the game, Golf Mag., 26(12), Dec 1984, 46-48, 90-91,

1.05.21., O'Brien, G., Golf is a case of mind over matter, Golf Monthly, 72(1), Jan 1982, 27-28,

1.05.21., O'Brien, G., How to become a good putter, Golf Monthly, 70(9), Sep 1980, 30-31, 33,

1.05.21., O'Brien, G., How to become a very poor putter, Golf Monthly, 72(8), Aug 1982, 101-102,

1.05.21., O'Brien, G., Putting ills cured, Golf World, 7(31), Jan 8, 1954, 10, Advocates watching the putter blade to keep it square: Your eyes will help direct your hands to do this job. Generally, pretty sound advice.

1.05.21., O'Brien, G., Think your way to better golf: Part I, Golf Monthly, 75(1), Jan 1985, 70-71,

1.05.21., Pirozzolo, Fran & Pate, Russ, The Mental Game Pocket Companion for Golf, (NY: HarperCollins, 1996), ,

1.05.21., Richardson, Peggy A. & Norton, Debra J., Competitive golf stress inventory (CGSI), In Ostrow, Andrew C., ed., Directory of Psychological Tests in the Sport and Exercise Sciences, (Morgantown, WV: Fitness Info. Technology Inc., 2d ed., 1996), item 34, 60-61,

1.05.21., Robinson, L., The psychology of golf, N. Am. Rev., 165, Dec 1897, 649-659,

1.05.21., Rotella, Robert J., Golfing Out of Your Mind, (New York: Simon & Schuster, audio tape, 1996), ,

1.05.21., Rotella, Robert J., Psychological considerations and pleasures of teaching golf to special populations, In Owens, D., ed., Teaching Golf to Special Populations, (New York: Leisure Press, 1984), 136-154,

1.05.21., Rotella, Robert J., Putting Out of Your Mind, (New York: Simon & Schuster, audio tape, 1996; book, 2001), ,

1.05.21., Rotella, Robert J. & Boutcher, S.H., A closer look at the role of the mind in golf, In Cochran, A.J., ed., Science and Golf: Proceedings of the First World Scientific Congress of Golf, St. Andrews, Scotland, (London: E. & F.N. Spon, 1990), 93-97,

1.05.21., Rotella, Robert J. & Bunker, L.K., Mind Mastery for Winning Golf: Using Your Head to Reach Par and to Enjoy Playing, (Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1981), , 146p

1.05.21., Rotella, Robert J. & Cullen, Bob, Golf is a Game of Confidence, (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1996), ,

1.05.21., Rotella, Robert J. & Cullen, Bob, Golf is not a Game of Perfect, (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1995), ,

1.05.21., Rotella, Robert J. & Cullen, Bob, The Golf of Your Dreams, (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1997), ,

1.05.21., Schon, Leslie, The Psychology of Golf, (London: Methuen, 1922), , 120p

1.05.21., Shapiro, Alan, Golf's Mental Hazards: OvercomeThem and Put an End to the Self-destructive Round, (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1996), ,

1.05.21., Silva, J.; Cornelius, A. & Finch, L., Psychological momentum and skill performance--a laboratory study, Abstracts of Research Papers, (1991), 278, These results are in agreement with the findings of previous research ... that PM [psychological momentum] is a cognitive interpretation of events occurring in a contest that currently is not supported by evidence from performance measures so that either the concept of PM is too simplistic of PM is a cognitive illusion.

1.05.21., Simek, Thomas & O'Brien, Richard M., Total Golf: A Behavioral Approach to Lowering Your Score and Getting More out of Your Game, (Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co., 1981), , bibliography, pp205-212

1.05.21., Stockton, Dave, Psych yourself to win: New PGA champion tells how any golfer can make his mind his strongest scoring weapon, Golf Dig., 21(10), Oct 1970, 30-31, 79, Creative thinking is the real goal. (30); The most important thing psycho-cybernetics did for me was teach me to get a better mental image, especially with my putting, which was a large problem this year until shortly before the PGA Championship. (31); As I began to direct my subconscious better, my putting improved in a hurry. (31); If you think about the shot creatively and don't jumble your mind with a lot of secondary thoughts, you have nothing to worry about. Just go ahead and have the boldness and confidence in your subconscious, to let it take over and do the job. (79)

1.05.21., Suggs, Louise, It's all in your head, In Sammis, F.R., ed., Golf for Women, (Garden City, NY: Routledge-Doubleday, 1960),

1.05.21., Thomas, Patrick R. & Over, Ray, Golf performance survey (GPS), In Ostrow, Andrew C., ed., Directory of Psychological Tests in the Sport and Exercise Sciences, (Morgantown, WV: Fitness Info. Technology Inc., 2d ed., 1996), item 299, 480-481,

1.05.21., Thomas, R.P. & Over, R., Contributions of psychological, psychomotor, and shot-making skills to prowess at golf, In Cochran, A.J. & Farrally, F.R., eds., Science and Golf II: Proceedings of the 1994 World Scientific Congress of Golf, St. Andrews, Scotland, (London: E. & F.N. Spon, 1994), 138-143,

1.05.21., Thomas, R.P. & Over, R., Psychological and psychomotor skills associated with performance in golf, Sports Psychologist, 8(1), 1994, NEED PAGES

1.05.21., Tolhurst, Desmond, A complete guide to the mind, Golf Mag., 21(2), Feb 1979, 223, 246,

1.05.21., Van Kampen, Ken, The mental side: Mental mastery, Golf Mag., 32(10), Oct 1990, 46-52, Dr. Fran , Chief of Neuropsychology Service, Baylor College of Medicine, 6501 Fannin, Houston, Texas 77030

1.05.21., Whitlatch, M., Mind versus muscle in golf, Century, 86, Aug 1913, 606-609,

1.05.21., Wiren, Gary, How to gain a competitive edge, Golf Dig., 32(2), Feb 1981, 72-73, 6 drills / 10 mins. each day: 1. relieve tension 2. increase imagery, kinesthetic awareness 3. improve self-concept and attitude 4. establish a routine 5. keep perspective about competitive golf 6. develop strategic plan for each round of golf.

1.05.21., Wiren, Gary, Search for the perfect teaching method, Motor Skills: Theory into Practice, 1(2), Spr 1977, 130-135,

1.05.21., Wiren, Gary & Taylor, D., Super-power Golf, (Chicago: Contemporary Books, 1984), ,

1.05.21., Wiren, Gary; Coop, Richard & Sheehan, Larry, The New Golf Mind, (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1978), ,

1.05.21., Wiren, Gary; Coop, Richard & Sheehan, Larry, The new golf mind, part 1: Each side of the brain has a function in the swing, Golf Dig., 29(8), Aug 1978, 67-70, 72-73, 75,

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